Category Archives: Uncategorized

Joseph_meeker_secondary_2
  • TITLE: Southern Stream Landscape
  • SIZE: 12″ X 16″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Board
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Joseph_meeker_secondary_1

Louisiana Bayou

A painter of southern landscapes, Joseph Meeker was born in Newark, New Jersey and grew up in Auburn, New York. He received a scholarship to the National Academy of Design in New York City, where he studied with the Hudson River School painter Asher B. Durand and with portraitist Charles Loring Elliott. After studying in New York City, he established a studio in Buffalo, 1849-52. He then moved to Louisville, Kentucky 1852-59, before settling permanently in St. Louis, Missouri, where he painted the Louisiana Bayou.

During the Civil War he fulfilled his military duties as a Union Navy paymaster on a gunboat that traveled the Mississippi River. While traveling along the Mississippi River he sketched the bayous and swamps of Louisiana.

When Meeker returned to St. Louis, Missouri, he became quite successful as a painter of southern landscapes based on the drawings he did in the military. During the 1870s and 1880s, Meeker worked in the manner of Luminism. “Meeker used light and color to heighten emotional impact and captured the hazy atmosphere light in the swampy environment. Meeker’s paintings were influenced by the nineteenth century’s waning romanticism and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem about eighteenth-century Acadian exiles, Evangeline.”

Meeker is best known for his bayou swamp scenes, but he also created landscapes of the New England coast, the Wyoming territories, Minnesota, along the Merrimac River (NH), and also created portraits and did some writing.

Source:

Groce and Wallace, “The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America”

Louisiana State Museum
http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/painting/meeker.htm

Peter Falk, “Who Was Who in American Art”

 

Source: www.askart.com

Jean-Manhaiem-third
  • TITLE: Woman in Kitchen
  • SIZE: 20″ x 26″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Anne Lorraine Vollmer

Jean-Mannheim

Woman Reading

Born in Bad Kreuznach on the Nahe, Germany on Nov. 18, 1863.  After being drafted into the German army, Mannheim deserted and fled to France where he studied art at Ecole Delecluse, Académie Colarossi, and with DeLancey and Bouguereau.  Having learned book binding early in life, he used this trade to support himself while studying art in Paris.

Upon immigrating to Illinois in 1884, he painted portraits in Chicago and taught in a Decatur art school.  About 1903 he accepted a position at Frank Brangwyn’s school in London and stayed for two years.  Returning to the U.S., he taught at the Denver Art School until 1908. He then made his final move to Pasadena and built a home in the Arroyo Seco.  Mannheim maintained a studio in the Blanchard Building in Los Angeles where he exhibited and taught, and in 1913 founded the Stickney Memorial School of Fine Arts in Pasadena.  His figure studies and landscapes prior to 1915 were tighter and done with a restricted palette; whereas, his palette then lightened and he adopted the loose brushwork of Impressionism. He died in Pasadena on Sept. 6, 1945.

Member: Laguna Beach AA; Long Beach AA.

Exh: Paris Salon, 1897; Blanchard Gallery (LA), 1909; Alaska-Yukon Expo (Seattle), 1909 (gold medal); Calif. Art Club, 1911-31; Kanst Gallery (LA), 1912, 1918; Pasadena Art Inst., 1913, 1926, 1928; Throop College (Pasadena), 1914; Woman’s Clubhouse (Hollywood), 1914; Friday Morning Club (LA), 1914, 1940; Panama-Calif. Expo (San Diego), 1915 (gold & silver medals); LACMA, 1915, 1917, 1922; Pasadena Society of Artists, 1917-37; Painters & Sculptors of LA, 1922-24; Arizona State Fair, 1923 (1st prize); Southby Salon (LA), 1925; Painters of the West (LA), 1925-27; Biltmore Salon (LA), 1926; Ebell Club (LA), 1926, 1935, 1936, 1938; Sierra Madre City Hall, 1930; Gardena High School, 1934; Foundation of Western Art (LA), 1935-42; Academy of Western Painters (LA), 1935; Webb Gallery (LA), 1938; GGIE, 1939.

In: Orange County (CA) Museum; Long Beach Museum; Denver Museum; Irvine (CA) Museum.

Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
Southern California Artists (Nancy Moure); Who’s Who in America 1918; American Art Annual 1919-29;Plein Air Painters (Ruth Westphal); Art in California (R. L. Bernier, 1916); Overland Monthly, Sept. 1933;Who’s Who in American Art 1936-41; So. Calif. Artists 1890-1940; Los Angeles Times, 4-5-1936 & 9-8-1945 (obituary).

 

Source: www.askart.com

Ray-Strong
  • TITLE: China Camp San Rafael
  • SIZE: 18″ x 24″
  • SIGNED: Lower Right
  • DATE: 1934
  • NOTES: Exhibited in the Steinbeck Center

Ray-Strong

Cow Country, Loyalton, CA

Landscape painter and muralist, Ray Strong was born in Corvallis, Oregon on January 2, 1905.  He began painting at age eight, and during his highschool years, spent Sundays with painter Clyde Keller working from the Columbia slough to Mt Hood.

Upon moving to San Francisco in 1924, he enrolled at the California School of Fine Art, and from there went to New York City where he continued his studies at the Art Students League under Frank DuMond.

Returning to San Francisco in 1931, Strong taught at the local Art Students League with Maynard Dixon, Frank Van Sloun, and George Post.  Taking over the old Beaux Arts Galleries on Maiden Lane, they formed an Artists Cooperative Gallery from 1934-39.

He did dioramas for both the San Diego Expo of 1935 and the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939.  Strong was a diorama painter for the U.S. Forest Service from 1935-38 and did similar work for the National Park Service during 1940-41.

Still active as an artist in his later years, from 1960, he has been a resident of Santa Barbara.  He was artist-in-residence at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History (1960-63) and co-founder of the Santa Barbara Art Institute. Ray Strong died on July 3, 2006

ASSOCIATIONS:
Oregon Society of Artists
Society of Western Artists
Palo Alto Art Club
California Society of Mural Painters
Santa Barbara Art Association
Mann Society of Artists

COLLECTIONS:
National Museum of American Art
Lassen, Rainier, and White Sands National Parks
Daly City High School
College of Mann
Society of California Pioneers

Murals: Santa Barbara Museum
Morro Bay State Park Museum
Keene Valley (NY) Congregational Church
Post Offices in San Gabriel, CA and Decatur, TX
Bacon Hall, UC Berkeley
Academy of Sciences (SF); Roosevelt Jr. High School (San Jose)
Santa Fe Railway Station in LA (done with Edith Hamlin and Buck Weaver)

Sources include:
American Art Annual, 1933; Who Was Who in American Art 1936-41; Interview

Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Sleeping Ducks
  • SIZE: 20″ X 30″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Louisiana Bayou

Louisiana Bayou

Meyer Straus was born in Bavaria in 1831.  He emigrated from Germany to the U.S. in 1848.  For a short while he lived in Ohio and in 1853 moved to St Louis, MO where he worked as a scene painter in the Old Pine Street Theater.

After a few years in Mobile, New Orleans, and other parts of the South, in 1872 he moved to Chicago where he painted scenery at Hooley’s Theater.  Due to failing health and the severe winters, he was forced to seek a milder climate.  In 1875 Straus made his final move to San Francisco where he continued painting theatrical scenery for Tom Maguire, proprietor of the Bush Street Theater, and for the Grand Opera House.

In 1876 he made a painting trip to Aspen, CO.  Returning to San Francisco, in 1877 he abandoned theater work to devote full time to easel painting.  After establishing a studio at 728 Montgomery, he began making sketching trips to Yosemite, Marin County, the Monterey Peninsula, and Oregon.  He illustrated these scenes in Century and other national magazines.  In 1890 he became a U.S. citizen and by that time was supporting himself with his paintings.

An accomplished and prolific oil painter, his oeuvre includes still lifes of fruit and flowers, missions, figure and interior studies, and his forte, landscapes of northern California.

Straus died in San Francisco on March 11, 1905.

Exh:  San Francisco Art Association, 1875-1910; Mechanics’ Inst. (SF), 1875-97; Calif. State Fair, 1879-96 (medals); New Orleans Expo, 1885; Bohemian Club.

In: Nevada Museum (Reno); Oakland Museum; CHS; Society of Calif. Pioneers.

Edan Hughes, author of the book “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
The Golden Era Magazine, April 1885; Bay of San Francisco.

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Louisiana Bayou
  • SIZE: 7.5″ x 18″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Board
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Meyer Straus was born in Bavaria in 1831.  He emigrated from Germany to the U.S. in 1848.  For a short while he lived in Ohio and in 1853 moved to St Louis, MO where he worked as a scene painter in the Old Pine Street Theater.

After a few years in Mobile, New Orleans, and other parts of the South, in 1872 he moved to Chicago where he painted scenery at Hooley’s Theater.  Due to failing health and the severe winters, he was forced to seek a milder climate.  In 1875 Straus made his final move to San Francisco where he continued painting theatrical scenery for Tom Maguire, proprietor of the Bush Street Theater, and for the Grand Opera House.

In 1876 he made a painting trip to Aspen, CO.  Returning to San Francisco, in 1877 he abandoned theater work to devote full time to easel painting.  After establishing a studio at 728 Montgomery, he began making sketching trips to Yosemite, Marin County, the Monterey Peninsula, and Oregon.  He illustrated these scenes in Century and other national magazines.  In 1890 he became a U.S. citizen and by that time was supporting himself with his paintings.

An accomplished and prolific oil painter, his oeuvre includes still lifes of fruit and flowers, missions, figure and interior studies, and his forte, landscapes of northern California.

Straus died in San Francisco on March 11, 1905.

Exh:  San Francisco Art Association, 1875-1910; Mechanics’ Inst. (SF), 1875-97; Calif. State Fair, 1879-96 (medals); New Orleans Expo, 1885; Bohemian Club.

In: Nevada Museum (Reno); Oakland Museum; CHS; Society of Calif. Pioneers.

Edan Hughes, author of the book “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
The Golden Era Magazine, April 1885; Bay of San Francisco.

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Tiburon Waterfront
  • SIZE: 12″ X 16″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • NOTES: Unfinished Painting on the Back
    Estate Letter

Train Cars with Grain

Selden-Gile-image_Fisherman_secondary

Italian Fisherman – Monterey

Boats in Harbor

Blue Bridge in Marin

The major force behind the Society of Six in the 1920s in the Bay Area of California, Selden Gile set aesthetic standards that espoused color and guided the group with the strength of his personality, physical energy, and warm hospitality.

Departing from dominant decorative and Tonalist influences of Arthur Mathews and William Keith, the Society of Six created a new landscape art of sunny reality; it was Impressionism-Fauvism applied to the California Scene.  The other painters associated with Gile in this rebellion were Maurice Logan, William Clapp, Bernard von Eichman, August Gay, and Louis Siegriest.

Gile was born in Stow, Maine, to parents from Salem, England, and was named for Seldon Connor, Governor of Maine.  The family lived on a farm, but from childhood, he was regarded as different from his boisterous, carousing brothers because of his artistic talents and apparent refinement.  He completed high school in 1894 in Fryeburg and then lived with his brother Frank in Portland, Maine, where he attended Shaw’s Business College.  Frank was head chef at the landmark Lafayette Hotel in Portland and taught Gile cooking and convivial hosting, qualities that would later serve him well in California among his artist colleagues.

General Marshall Wentworth, owner of a hostelry in Jackson, New Hampshire, where Selden worked, took an interest in the young man and arranged a job as paymaster and clerk on a vast ranch in Rocklin, California, near Sacramento. Selden’s reasons for wanting to head West are unknown, but one of his brothers loaned him fifty dollars for the journey.  His job was dangerous, requiring him to deliver the payroll from the bank to the ranch, and he carried a gun which he sometimes used to defend himself.

He fell in love with Beryl Whitney, daughter of the ranch owners, and was deeply hurt when her parents, disapproving of the relationship, sent her away to Europe and she married another man.  From that time, he had an open aversion to women. In 1905, he moved to Oakland, California, and worked as a salesman of ceramic building materials for Gladding McBean whose products became crucial in the rebuilding of San Francisco after the earthquake.

He was basically self taught as an artist and with high energy and a sturdy build, had a capacity for long hiking trips and outdoor, plein-air painting that he pursued passionately.  Few of his early paintings of California survive, but most existing ones have barns, which became a repeated symbol in his work of the artist himself.

His talents as food and drink host and provider of lodging became legendary.  He shared his house with several aspiring artists and held dinners that he prepared with skill in what was described as an all-male, raucous atmosphere.  Friendship with writer Jack London underscored Gile’s seeking out of people that were creative, romantic, assertive, and working class.

With the Six, he exhibited regularly at the Oakland Art Gallery.  In 1927, he moved north to Tiburon across the Golden Gate Bridge and after that to a houseboat in Belvedere from where he continued to paint.  However, he also fell in with a heavy drinking crowd, which affected the quality of his work and caused him to fore-go his energetic plein-air painting treks.

Indicated by his painting, Desert Bridge, Holbrook, dated 1926, Gile traveled to Arizona where, according to author and gallery owner, Alfred Harrison, his subject was Holbrook, Arizona.   Several years later, according to Harrison, Gile was in Taos, New Mexico which resulted in his painting, Woman of Taos, dated 1931.  Further evidence of Gile being in Taos is his painting, Taos, New Mexico, dated 1924, which is in the collection of the Oakland Museum.

It is likely that Gile, who was Belvedere’s only WPA mural commission artist during the Depression years, was in Taos with fellow painter, Maurice Logan.  They returned to the Southwest in 1934 according to a front page column of the Oakland Tribune February 21 of that year.

On June 8, 1947, Selden Gile died from alcoholism and is buried at the cemetery at Mt. Tamalpais, a site he loved to paint.

Sources: 

Nancy Boas, Society of Six

Timothy Burgard, Ednah Root Curator of American Art (12/05/2006 email about Gile’s painting in NewMexico and Arizona)

Timothy Burgard and Alfred Harrison, “California Landscapes from the Willrich Collection”, American Art Review, 12/2006, p. 78

Michael and Genta Holmes, Art in the Residence of the American Ambassador, Australia (photo of Taos, New Mexico painting, 1924)

 

Source: www.askart.com

Italian Fisherman – Monterey

Train & Barn

Sailboats Belvedere

Boats in Harbor

Blue Bridge in Marin

Tiburon Waterfront

The major force behind the Society of Six in the 1920s in the Bay Area of California, Selden Gile set aesthetic standards that espoused color and guided the group with the strength of his personality, physical energy, and warm hospitality.

Departing from dominant decorative and Tonalist influences of Arthur Mathews and William Keith, the Society of Six created a new landscape art of sunny reality; it was Impressionism-Fauvism applied to the California Scene.  The other painters associated with Gile in this rebellion were Maurice Logan, William Clapp, Bernard von Eichman, August Gay, and Louis Siegriest.

Gile was born in Stow, Maine, to parents from Salem, England, and was named for Seldon Connor, Governor of Maine.  The family lived on a farm, but from childhood, he was regarded as different from his boisterous, carousing brothers because of his artistic talents and apparent refinement.  He completed high school in 1894 in Fryeburg and then lived with his brother Frank in Portland, Maine, where he attended Shaw’s Business College.  Frank was head chef at the landmark Lafayette Hotel in Portland and taught Gile cooking and convivial hosting, qualities that would later serve him well in California among his artist colleagues.

General Marshall Wentworth, owner of a hostelry in Jackson, New Hampshire, where Selden worked, took an interest in the young man and arranged a job as paymaster and clerk on a vast ranch in Rocklin, California, near Sacramento. Selden’s reasons for wanting to head West are unknown, but one of his brothers loaned him fifty dollars for the journey.  His job was dangerous, requiring him to deliver the payroll from the bank to the ranch, and he carried a gun which he sometimes used to defend himself.

He fell in love with Beryl Whitney, daughter of the ranch owners, and was deeply hurt when her parents, disapproving of the relationship, sent her away to Europe and she married another man.  From that time, he had an open aversion to women. In 1905, he moved to Oakland, California, and worked as a salesman of ceramic building materials for Gladding McBean whose products became crucial in the rebuilding of San Francisco after the earthquake.

He was basically self taught as an artist and with high energy and a sturdy build, had a capacity for long hiking trips and outdoor, plein-air painting that he pursued passionately.  Few of his early paintings of California survive, but most existing ones have barns, which became a repeated symbol in his work of the artist himself.

His talents as food and drink host and provider of lodging became legendary.  He shared his house with several aspiring artists and held dinners that he prepared with skill in what was described as an all-male, raucous atmosphere.  Friendship with writer Jack London underscored Gile’s seeking out of people that were creative, romantic, assertive, and working class.

With the Six, he exhibited regularly at the Oakland Art Gallery.  In 1927, he moved north to Tiburon across the Golden Gate Bridge and after that to a houseboat in Belvedere from where he continued to paint.  However, he also fell in with a heavy drinking crowd, which affected the quality of his work and caused him to fore-go his energetic plein-air painting treks.

Indicated by his painting, Desert Bridge, Holbrook, dated 1926, Gile traveled to Arizona where, according to author and gallery owner, Alfred Harrison, his subject was Holbrook, Arizona.   Several years later, according to Harrison, Gile was in Taos, New Mexico which resulted in his painting, Woman of Taos, dated 1931.  Further evidence of Gile being in Taos is his painting, Taos, New Mexico, dated 1924, which is in the collection of the Oakland Museum.

It is likely that Gile, who was Belvedere’s only WPA mural commission artist during the Depression years, was in Taos with fellow painter, Maurice Logan.  They returned to the Southwest in 1934 according to a front page column of the Oakland Tribune February 21 of that year.

On June 8, 1947, Selden Gile died from alcoholism and is buried at the cemetery at Mt. Tamalpais, a site he loved to paint.

Sources: 

Nancy Boas, Society of Six

Timothy Burgard, Ednah Root Curator of American Art (12/05/2006 email about Gile’s painting in NewMexico and Arizona)

Timothy Burgard and Alfred Harrison, “California Landscapes from the Willrich Collection”, American Art Review, 12/2006, p. 78

Michael and Genta Holmes, Art in the Residence of the American Ambassador, Australia (photo of Taos, New Mexico painting, 1924)

 

Source: www.askart.com

      • TITLE: Horses
      • SIZE: 25.25″ X 30″
      • MEDIUM: Watercolor
      • SIGNED: Lower Right
      • DATE: c.1910
      • NOTES:
        • Gold Medal 1910 American Water Color Society
        • Exhibited in the Chicago Art Institute 1910

 

Horse and Cart

Born in Nuremberg, Germany on July 11, 1864. Ritschel was educated at the Latin and Industrial School in Nuremberg. As a youth he worked as a sailor and it was during this time that he began sketching marine subjects. He studied art at the Royal Academy in Munich under Raupp and Kaulbach before immigrating to NYC in 1895. In 1911 he settled in Carmel, CA while continuing to exhibit on the East Coast and in Europe. His paintings of the sea earned him international acclaim and in 1914 he was elected a member of the National Academy. In 1918 he began construction on his ocean view studio-home in the Carmel Highlands. This castle-like stone structure was to remain his home for the rest of his life except for trips throughout the world, especially the South Seas where he frequently visited. Oldtimers on the Monterey Peninsula remember him garbed in a flowered sarong and perched on a cypress-covered cliff with brushes and easel. Ritschel died at his Carmel home on March 11, 1949. Member: NY WC Club; American WC Society; Carmel AA; Bohemian Club; Société Internationale des Beaux Arts et des Lettres (Paris); Academy of Western Painters (LA); Allied AA; NAC. Exh: SFAA, 1911; NAD, 1913 (prize), 1921 (prize), 1926; NAC, 1914 (gold medal); PPIE, 1915 (gold medal); Calif. State Fair, 1916 (gold medal), 1926 (1st prize); Philadelphia Arts Club, 1918 (gold medal); Calif. WC Society, 1921-23; Salmagundi Club, 1923 (Isador prize), 1930; AIC, 1923 (prize); Royal Academy, 1924; Paris Salon, 1926; Stendahl Gallery (LA), 1929; Santa Cruz Art League, 1937; GGIE, 1939; Biltmore Salon (LA), 1944. In: NAC; NMAA; Monterey Peninsula Museum; PAFA; Oakland Museum; Fort Worth Museum; St Louis Museum; Bowers Museum (Santa Ana); Detroit Art Club; AIC; LACMA; Minneapolis Museum; Crocker Museum (Sacramento); Irvine (CA) Museum; Orange Co. (CA) Museum.

Source:
Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
American Art Annual 1919-33; Who’s Who in American Art 1936-47; NY Times, 3-13-1949 (obituary).

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Sand Dunes
  • SIZE: 16″ X 20″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Poppies and Lupens

Carmel Beach

One of California’s most notable Impressionist* painters and considered the first resident Impressionist of that state, Granville Redmond is known for his landscapes, many of them floral with poppies and lupines.  He was also one of the first Tonalist* painters of California, a subdued monochromatic* style of haze, fog and moonlight that reportedly “he was more drawn to”. . .(Gerdts 27).   Redmond was also a popular personality and held friendships with many celebrities in the arts, despite certain physical handicaps of his own most especially deafness.

He was born in Philadelphia with the name Grenville Richard Seymour Redmond. At the age of two and a half, he became totally deaf due to scarlet fever, and lived his whole life without hearing or speech.  In 1874, the family moved to San Jose, and from 1879 to 1890, he attended the California School of the Deaf in Berkeley.  There his art teacher, Theophilus D’Estrella, who was also deaf, was a major influence, and Redmond decided to continue art studies at the San Francisco School of Design*.  His teachers included Arthur Mathews and Amedee Joullion.

Redmond distinguished himself, winning the W.E. Brown medal of excellence, and in 1893 was awarded funds from the California School of the Deaf, which made it possible for him to study in Paris at the Academie Julian* under Jean Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant.  At the Academie Julian, he roomed with sculptor Douglas Tilden, another graduate of the California School for the Deaf.  While in Paris, Redmond distinguished himself once again, when in 1895 his large canvas, Matin d’Hiver, was accepted for the Paris Salon*.

At the California School of Design, he had become acquainted with many other artists including Tonalists* Gottardo Piazzoni, with whom Redmond made several painting trips around California, and Giuseppe Cadenasso, to whom he gave encouragement.  Piazzoni learned sign language, and he and Redmond were lifelong friends.  They roomed together in Parkfield, California, and also in Tiburon.  At that time, it was difficult for artists and would-be artists in San Francisco and in the West to find ways to practice their fine art.  Opportunities in commercial illustration were a little brighter, and Redmond and many other artists were drawn to newspapers and local magazines such as the Overland Monthly as sources of revenue.

In 1898, he returned to California, changed his first name to Granville, and settled in Los Angeles, where he painted many scenes of Laguna Beach, Catalina Island, and San Pedro.  He was married in 1899 to Carrie Ann Jean, a graduate of the Illinois School for the Deaf.  Together they had three children.  While living in Los Angeles, he became friends with Charlie Chaplin, whom he helped in perfecting his pantomime techniques.  Chaplin gave Redmond a studio on the movie lot, collected many of his paintings, and sponsored him in silent acting roles including playing the sculptor in City Lights, and a feature part in You’d Be Surprised.  He also got to know Los Angeles neighbor artists Elmer Wachtel and Norman St. Clair.  All three exhibited paintings with Laguna Beach titles at the annual Spring Exhibition held in San Francisco in 1904.   By 1905 Redmond was receiving considerable recognition as a leading landscape painter and bold colorist.

Redmond’s early works in Los Angeles were mostly moody Tonal landscapes, scenes of farmers and their animals, and nocturnes similar to those by John Bond Francisco and other scenic painters in Northern California.  Redmond also sought subjects throughout the state’s coastal regions, such as Silver and Gold (oil on canvas, Laguna Art Museum), and often summered in Monterey County, where he later settled in 1908.  In 1910, he moved farther north to San Mateo, becoming a member of San Francisco’s art establishment, but he continued to exhibit in Los Angeles and to associate with that city’s artists, returning to live there in 1918.

From 1910 to 1917, he spent time in various Northern California locations, studying and painting.  About the time he moved north, Redmond turned to rendering sweeping terrains covered with highly colorful wildflowers, especially the purple lupine and California’s state flower, the golden poppy.  He developed a colorist method and brushwork linked to Impressionism, though he was motivated more by his subjects than by aesthetic theory.  West Coast critics at that time noted his use of Pointillism* and likened his art to that of Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro.  Although Redmond recognized the public’s preference for his brightly colored poppy pictures, he generally preferred to paint darker, more poetic scenes.  Some of his finest paintings are of Catalina Island in Southern California, and of the oaks of Monterey County in Northern California.

His work is held in many collections including: Laguna Beach Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Stanford University Museum, the De Young Museum, the Bancroft Library at the University of California in Berkeley, The California School for the Deaf, the New York City Museum, and the Oakland Museum, where in 1989, a retrospective of his work was shown. He was also a member of numerous clubs, including The Bohemian Club of San Francisco, the California Art Club, The Laguna Beach Art Association, and the San Francisco Art Association.

Granville Redmond died on May 24, 1935 in Los Angeles.

Source:
Edan Hughes, Artists in California, 1786-1940
Michael David Zellman, 300 Years of American Art
William Gerdts, “American Tonalism: An Artistic Overview”, Essay in The Poetic Vision: American Tonalism, pp. 15-27, Spanierman Galleries, LLC. 2005
 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Carmel Beach
  • SIZE: 12″ X 24″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Poppies and Lupens

Sand Dunes

One of California’s most notable Impressionist* painters and considered the first resident Impressionist of that state, Granville Redmond is known for his landscapes, many of them floral with poppies and lupines.  He was also one of the first Tonalist* painters of California, a subdued monochromatic* style of haze, fog and moonlight that reportedly “he was more drawn to”. . .(Gerdts 27).   Redmond was also a popular personality and held friendships with many celebrities in the arts, despite certain physical handicaps of his own most especially deafness.

He was born in Philadelphia with the name Grenville Richard Seymour Redmond. At the age of two and a half, he became totally deaf due to scarlet fever, and lived his whole life without hearing or speech.  In 1874, the family moved to San Jose, and from 1879 to 1890, he attended the California School of the Deaf in Berkeley.  There his art teacher, Theophilus D’Estrella, who was also deaf, was a major influence, and Redmond decided to continue art studies at the San Francisco School of Design*.  His teachers included Arthur Mathews and Amedee Joullion.

Redmond distinguished himself, winning the W.E. Brown medal of excellence, and in 1893 was awarded funds from the California School of the Deaf, which made it possible for him to study in Paris at the Academie Julian* under Jean Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant.  At the Academie Julian, he roomed with sculptor Douglas Tilden, another graduate of the California School for the Deaf.  While in Paris, Redmond distinguished himself once again, when in 1895 his large canvas, Matin d’Hiver, was accepted for the Paris Salon*.

At the California School of Design, he had become acquainted with many other artists including Tonalists* Gottardo Piazzoni, with whom Redmond made several painting trips around California, and Giuseppe Cadenasso, to whom he gave encouragement.  Piazzoni learned sign language, and he and Redmond were lifelong friends.  They roomed together in Parkfield, California, and also in Tiburon.  At that time, it was difficult for artists and would-be artists in San Francisco and in the West to find ways to practice their fine art.  Opportunities in commercial illustration were a little brighter, and Redmond and many other artists were drawn to newspapers and local magazines such as the Overland Monthly as sources of revenue.

In 1898, he returned to California, changed his first name to Granville, and settled in Los Angeles, where he painted many scenes of Laguna Beach, Catalina Island, and San Pedro.  He was married in 1899 to Carrie Ann Jean, a graduate of the Illinois School for the Deaf.  Together they had three children.  While living in Los Angeles, he became friends with Charlie Chaplin, whom he helped in perfecting his pantomime techniques.  Chaplin gave Redmond a studio on the movie lot, collected many of his paintings, and sponsored him in silent acting roles including playing the sculptor in City Lights, and a feature part in You’d Be Surprised.  He also got to know Los Angeles neighbor artists Elmer Wachtel and Norman St. Clair.  All three exhibited paintings with Laguna Beach titles at the annual Spring Exhibition held in San Francisco in 1904.   By 1905 Redmond was receiving considerable recognition as a leading landscape painter and bold colorist.

Redmond’s early works in Los Angeles were mostly moody Tonal landscapes, scenes of farmers and their animals, and nocturnes similar to those by John Bond Francisco and other scenic painters in Northern California.  Redmond also sought subjects throughout the state’s coastal regions, such as Silver and Gold (oil on canvas, Laguna Art Museum), and often summered in Monterey County, where he later settled in 1908.  In 1910, he moved farther north to San Mateo, becoming a member of San Francisco’s art establishment, but he continued to exhibit in Los Angeles and to associate with that city’s artists, returning to live there in 1918.

From 1910 to 1917, he spent time in various Northern California locations, studying and painting.  About the time he moved north, Redmond turned to rendering sweeping terrains covered with highly colorful wildflowers, especially the purple lupine and California’s state flower, the golden poppy.  He developed a colorist method and brushwork linked to Impressionism, though he was motivated more by his subjects than by aesthetic theory.  West Coast critics at that time noted his use of Pointillism* and likened his art to that of Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro.  Although Redmond recognized the public’s preference for his brightly colored poppy pictures, he generally preferred to paint darker, more poetic scenes.  Some of his finest paintings are of Catalina Island in Southern California, and of the oaks of Monterey County in Northern California.

His work is held in many collections including: Laguna Beach Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Stanford University Museum, the De Young Museum, the Bancroft Library at the University of California in Berkeley, The California School for the Deaf, the New York City Museum, and the Oakland Museum, where in 1989, a retrospective of his work was shown. He was also a member of numerous clubs, including The Bohemian Club of San Francisco, the California Art Club, The Laguna Beach Art Association, and the San Francisco Art Association.

Granville Redmond died on May 24, 1935 in Los Angeles.

Source:
Edan Hughes, Artists in California, 1786-1940
Michael David Zellman, 300 Years of American Art
William Gerdts, “American Tonalism: An Artistic Overview”, Essay in The Poetic Vision: American Tonalism, pp. 15-27, Spanierman Galleries, LLC. 2005
Source: www.askart.com