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Lee-Randolph
  • TITLE: Mountain Landscape
  • SIZE: 25″ X 29″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Lee Randolph is noted for his Impressionist landscapes and portraits. He was born in 1880 in Ravenna, Ohio. He started his art training at Stevenson Art School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and later studied under Frank Duvenek and Thomas Noble at the Cincinnati Art Academy. In New York City Randolph attended the Art Students League where Kenny Cox and George Bridgeman were his instructors. He traveled to Europe for ten years of art study, spending time in Paris, France, and Rome, Italy. In Paris he studied at Academie Julian under the instruction of Jean Paul Laurens and at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts under Bonnat and Marson. Randolph relocated to California in 1913 where he stayed briefly in the Monterey area before settling in San Francisco. He became a member of the Bohemian Club and the California Society of Etchers. In the winter 1915 he taught at University of California, Berkeley, and in 1917 he began a twenty-five year position as director of the California School of Fine Arts. In 1915 he received a bronze medal at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. He exhibited at the Del Monte Art Gallery (1916), the Oakland Art Gallery (1916), the Paris Salon (1935), and the San Francisco Art Association (1916). He spent most of his later years in the Carmel area where he was an active member of the Carmel Art Association. He died in Salinas, California in 1956.

 

Source: www.askart.com

Henrietta-Shore
  • TITLE: Female Portrait
  • SIZE: 25″ X 20″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Born in Toronto, Canada on Jan. 22, 1880, Henrietta Shore began painting at age 13 and studied at St Mary’s College in Toronto and later in New York City at the Art Students League with William Merritt Chase, Frank Vincent Dumond, and Robert Henri.

While in London she continued at the Heatherly Art School and was the only private pupil of John Singer Sargent who greatly influenced her work. After arriving in Los Angeles in 1913, she became active in the local art scene and was a founder of the Modern Art Society. She maintained a studio in Los Angeles until 1920 and then led a peripatic existence: Newfoundland (1920), Maine (1921, NYC (1920-23), Mexico 1927-28), and San Francisco (1928-29).

Shore was internationally known when an invitation to exhibit brought her to the Monterey Peninsula in 1930. After establishing a studio in Carmel, she remained and continued painting. Penniless, she spent her last few years were in the State Mental Hospital in San Jose, CA where she died on May 17, 1963.

Her early works were realistic but matured into impressionist and semi-abstract forms. Her visual repertoire includes landscapes, figure studies, portraiture, and floral still lifes. Robert Henri hailed her as one of the great women painters of her time.

Henrietta Shore and her Work by Merle Armitage was published in 1963, and a chapter was devoted to her in the 1939 book entitled Art from the Mayans to Walt Disney by Jean Charlot.

Memberships: Society of Independent Artists; NY Society of Women Artists (founder); Painters & Sculptors of LA (founder).

Exhibitions:
Panama-California Expo (San Diego), 1915 (silver medal); San Francisco Art Association, 1916-30 (prizes); LA Museum of History, Science & Art, 1914, 1917, 1918, 1927; California Art Club, 1917; Modern Art Workers (LA), 1919-25; California Watercolor Society, 1926; San Diego Fine Arts Gallery, 1927 (solo); San Francisco Women Artists, 1928 (1st prize); California Palace of the Legion of Honor, 1928, 1931 (solos); Watrous Gallery (Carmel), 1933; De Young Museum, 1933 (solo); Foundation of Western Art (LA), 1935; Golden Gate International Exposition, 1939; Carmel Art Association, 1946, 1963 (solos); Monterey Peninsula Museum, 1986 and Laguna Museum, 1987 (solos).

Collections:
DeSaisset Museum (Santa Clara); Library of Congress; Nat’l Gallery of Canada; San Diego Museum; Dallas Museum; University of Washington (Seattle).

Murals: Assessor’s Office (SF); Santa Cruz (CA) Post Office; Custom House and Post Office (Monterey).

Source:
Edan Hughes, Artists in California, 1786-1940

 

Source: www.askart.com

Joseph_meeker_secondary_2
  • TITLE: Southern Stream Landscape
  • SIZE: 12″ X 16″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Board
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Joseph_meeker_secondary_1

Louisiana Bayou

A painter of southern landscapes, Joseph Meeker was born in Newark, New Jersey and grew up in Auburn, New York. He received a scholarship to the National Academy of Design in New York City, where he studied with the Hudson River School painter Asher B. Durand and with portraitist Charles Loring Elliott. After studying in New York City, he established a studio in Buffalo, 1849-52. He then moved to Louisville, Kentucky 1852-59, before settling permanently in St. Louis, Missouri, where he painted the Louisiana Bayou.

During the Civil War he fulfilled his military duties as a Union Navy paymaster on a gunboat that traveled the Mississippi River. While traveling along the Mississippi River he sketched the bayous and swamps of Louisiana.

When Meeker returned to St. Louis, Missouri, he became quite successful as a painter of southern landscapes based on the drawings he did in the military. During the 1870s and 1880s, Meeker worked in the manner of Luminism. “Meeker used light and color to heighten emotional impact and captured the hazy atmosphere light in the swampy environment. Meeker’s paintings were influenced by the nineteenth century’s waning romanticism and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem about eighteenth-century Acadian exiles, Evangeline.”

Meeker is best known for his bayou swamp scenes, but he also created landscapes of the New England coast, the Wyoming territories, Minnesota, along the Merrimac River (NH), and also created portraits and did some writing.

Source:

Groce and Wallace, “The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America”

Louisiana State Museum
http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/painting/meeker.htm

Peter Falk, “Who Was Who in American Art”

 

Source: www.askart.com

Joseph_meeker_secondary_1
  • TITLE: Louisiana Bayou
  • SIZE: 24″ X 36″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Joseph_meeker_secondary_2

Southern Stream Landscape

A painter of southern landscapes, Joseph Meeker was born in Newark, New Jersey and grew up in Auburn, New York. He received a scholarship to the National Academy of Design in New York City, where he studied with the Hudson River School painter Asher B. Durand and with portraitist Charles Loring Elliott. After studying in New York City, he established a studio in Buffalo, 1849-52. He then moved to Louisville, Kentucky 1852-59, before settling permanently in St. Louis, Missouri, where he painted the Louisiana Bayou.

During the Civil War he fulfilled his military duties as a Union Navy paymaster on a gunboat that traveled the Mississippi River. While traveling along the Mississippi River he sketched the bayous and swamps of Louisiana.

When Meeker returned to St. Louis, Missouri, he became quite successful as a painter of southern landscapes based on the drawings he did in the military. During the 1870s and 1880s, Meeker worked in the manner of Luminism. “Meeker used light and color to heighten emotional impact and captured the hazy atmosphere light in the swampy environment. Meeker’s paintings were influenced by the nineteenth century’s waning romanticism and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem about eighteenth-century Acadian exiles, Evangeline.”

Meeker is best known for his bayou swamp scenes, but he also created landscapes of the New England coast, the Wyoming territories, Minnesota, along the Merrimac River (NH), and also created portraits and did some writing.

Source:

Groce and Wallace, “The New York Historical Society’s Dictionary of Artists in America”

Louisiana State Museum
http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/painting/meeker.htm

Peter Falk, “Who Was Who in American Art”

 

Source: www.askart.com

Jean-Manhaiem-third
  • TITLE: Woman in Kitchen
  • SIZE: 20″ x 26″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Anne Lorraine Vollmer

Jean-Mannheim

Woman Reading

Born in Bad Kreuznach on the Nahe, Germany on Nov. 18, 1863.  After being drafted into the German army, Mannheim deserted and fled to France where he studied art at Ecole Delecluse, Académie Colarossi, and with DeLancey and Bouguereau.  Having learned book binding early in life, he used this trade to support himself while studying art in Paris.

Upon immigrating to Illinois in 1884, he painted portraits in Chicago and taught in a Decatur art school.  About 1903 he accepted a position at Frank Brangwyn’s school in London and stayed for two years.  Returning to the U.S., he taught at the Denver Art School until 1908. He then made his final move to Pasadena and built a home in the Arroyo Seco.  Mannheim maintained a studio in the Blanchard Building in Los Angeles where he exhibited and taught, and in 1913 founded the Stickney Memorial School of Fine Arts in Pasadena.  His figure studies and landscapes prior to 1915 were tighter and done with a restricted palette; whereas, his palette then lightened and he adopted the loose brushwork of Impressionism. He died in Pasadena on Sept. 6, 1945.

Member: Laguna Beach AA; Long Beach AA.

Exh: Paris Salon, 1897; Blanchard Gallery (LA), 1909; Alaska-Yukon Expo (Seattle), 1909 (gold medal); Calif. Art Club, 1911-31; Kanst Gallery (LA), 1912, 1918; Pasadena Art Inst., 1913, 1926, 1928; Throop College (Pasadena), 1914; Woman’s Clubhouse (Hollywood), 1914; Friday Morning Club (LA), 1914, 1940; Panama-Calif. Expo (San Diego), 1915 (gold & silver medals); LACMA, 1915, 1917, 1922; Pasadena Society of Artists, 1917-37; Painters & Sculptors of LA, 1922-24; Arizona State Fair, 1923 (1st prize); Southby Salon (LA), 1925; Painters of the West (LA), 1925-27; Biltmore Salon (LA), 1926; Ebell Club (LA), 1926, 1935, 1936, 1938; Sierra Madre City Hall, 1930; Gardena High School, 1934; Foundation of Western Art (LA), 1935-42; Academy of Western Painters (LA), 1935; Webb Gallery (LA), 1938; GGIE, 1939.

In: Orange County (CA) Museum; Long Beach Museum; Denver Museum; Irvine (CA) Museum.

Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
Southern California Artists (Nancy Moure); Who’s Who in America 1918; American Art Annual 1919-29;Plein Air Painters (Ruth Westphal); Art in California (R. L. Bernier, 1916); Overland Monthly, Sept. 1933;Who’s Who in American Art 1936-41; So. Calif. Artists 1890-1940; Los Angeles Times, 4-5-1936 & 9-8-1945 (obituary).

 

Source: www.askart.com

Ray-Strong
  • TITLE: China Camp San Rafael
  • SIZE: 18″ x 24″
  • SIGNED: Lower Right
  • DATE: 1934
  • NOTES: Exhibited in the Steinbeck Center

Ray-Strong

Cow Country, Loyalton, CA

Landscape painter and muralist, Ray Strong was born in Corvallis, Oregon on January 2, 1905.  He began painting at age eight, and during his highschool years, spent Sundays with painter Clyde Keller working from the Columbia slough to Mt Hood.

Upon moving to San Francisco in 1924, he enrolled at the California School of Fine Art, and from there went to New York City where he continued his studies at the Art Students League under Frank DuMond.

Returning to San Francisco in 1931, Strong taught at the local Art Students League with Maynard Dixon, Frank Van Sloun, and George Post.  Taking over the old Beaux Arts Galleries on Maiden Lane, they formed an Artists Cooperative Gallery from 1934-39.

He did dioramas for both the San Diego Expo of 1935 and the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939.  Strong was a diorama painter for the U.S. Forest Service from 1935-38 and did similar work for the National Park Service during 1940-41.

Still active as an artist in his later years, from 1960, he has been a resident of Santa Barbara.  He was artist-in-residence at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History (1960-63) and co-founder of the Santa Barbara Art Institute. Ray Strong died on July 3, 2006

ASSOCIATIONS:
Oregon Society of Artists
Society of Western Artists
Palo Alto Art Club
California Society of Mural Painters
Santa Barbara Art Association
Mann Society of Artists

COLLECTIONS:
National Museum of American Art
Lassen, Rainier, and White Sands National Parks
Daly City High School
College of Mann
Society of California Pioneers

Murals: Santa Barbara Museum
Morro Bay State Park Museum
Keene Valley (NY) Congregational Church
Post Offices in San Gabriel, CA and Decatur, TX
Bacon Hall, UC Berkeley
Academy of Sciences (SF); Roosevelt Jr. High School (San Jose)
Santa Fe Railway Station in LA (done with Edith Hamlin and Buck Weaver)

Sources include:
American Art Annual, 1933; Who Was Who in American Art 1936-41; Interview

Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
Source: www.askart.com

Willian-Posy-Silva-new
  • TITLE:
  • SIZE: 10″ X 12″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Board
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

A landscape painter, William Silva was an important art world figure in Tennessee and also in California, where he moved in 1913 and for thirty-five years devoted himself to painting cypresses, eucalypti, dunes, and coasts.

He was born in Savannah, Georgia, and studied at Chatham Academy and engineering at the University of Virginia. He inherited the family chinaware business, which he ran successfully for thirty years until he began painting at age 50.

In 1887, he moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and there became known as “the finest artist at the turn of the century” (Gerdts Art Across America, V III). He painted in an impressionist style and did many panoramic views of Chattanooga as well as paintings of the pine forests near Savannah. Initially he pursued his chinaware business there, but in 1894, began to take art instruction.

Encouraged by his wife, he retired from his business in 1907 and enrolled at the Academy Julian in Paris as a student of Jean Paul Laurens. He also painted with American artist Chauncey Ryder. Recognition came quickly, and he had his first solo exhibition in 1909 in Paris at the Georges Petit Gallery.

That same year he returned to Chattanooga, and a moment of great fame was the winning of the silver medal in 1910 at the Appalachian Exposition in Knoxville where he displayed seventy canvases. He then moved to Washington D.C. where he was active in the Society of Washington Artists until he moved to California in 1913.

He built a studio off Carmelita Street in the sand dunes but continued to exhibit with the Southern States Art League and also maintained close ties with his birthplace, Savannah, where in 1917 a solo exhibition was held at the Telfair Academy. He was a member of numerous organizations including the California Art Club and the Salmagundi Club.

He died on February 10, 1948.

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Sleeping Ducks
  • SIZE: 20″ X 30″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Louisiana Bayou

Louisiana Bayou

Meyer Straus was born in Bavaria in 1831.  He emigrated from Germany to the U.S. in 1848.  For a short while he lived in Ohio and in 1853 moved to St Louis, MO where he worked as a scene painter in the Old Pine Street Theater.

After a few years in Mobile, New Orleans, and other parts of the South, in 1872 he moved to Chicago where he painted scenery at Hooley’s Theater.  Due to failing health and the severe winters, he was forced to seek a milder climate.  In 1875 Straus made his final move to San Francisco where he continued painting theatrical scenery for Tom Maguire, proprietor of the Bush Street Theater, and for the Grand Opera House.

In 1876 he made a painting trip to Aspen, CO.  Returning to San Francisco, in 1877 he abandoned theater work to devote full time to easel painting.  After establishing a studio at 728 Montgomery, he began making sketching trips to Yosemite, Marin County, the Monterey Peninsula, and Oregon.  He illustrated these scenes in Century and other national magazines.  In 1890 he became a U.S. citizen and by that time was supporting himself with his paintings.

An accomplished and prolific oil painter, his oeuvre includes still lifes of fruit and flowers, missions, figure and interior studies, and his forte, landscapes of northern California.

Straus died in San Francisco on March 11, 1905.

Exh:  San Francisco Art Association, 1875-1910; Mechanics’ Inst. (SF), 1875-97; Calif. State Fair, 1879-96 (medals); New Orleans Expo, 1885; Bohemian Club.

In: Nevada Museum (Reno); Oakland Museum; CHS; Society of Calif. Pioneers.

Edan Hughes, author of the book “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
The Golden Era Magazine, April 1885; Bay of San Francisco.

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Louisiana Bayou
  • SIZE: 7.5″ x 18″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Board
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Meyer Straus was born in Bavaria in 1831.  He emigrated from Germany to the U.S. in 1848.  For a short while he lived in Ohio and in 1853 moved to St Louis, MO where he worked as a scene painter in the Old Pine Street Theater.

After a few years in Mobile, New Orleans, and other parts of the South, in 1872 he moved to Chicago where he painted scenery at Hooley’s Theater.  Due to failing health and the severe winters, he was forced to seek a milder climate.  In 1875 Straus made his final move to San Francisco where he continued painting theatrical scenery for Tom Maguire, proprietor of the Bush Street Theater, and for the Grand Opera House.

In 1876 he made a painting trip to Aspen, CO.  Returning to San Francisco, in 1877 he abandoned theater work to devote full time to easel painting.  After establishing a studio at 728 Montgomery, he began making sketching trips to Yosemite, Marin County, the Monterey Peninsula, and Oregon.  He illustrated these scenes in Century and other national magazines.  In 1890 he became a U.S. citizen and by that time was supporting himself with his paintings.

An accomplished and prolific oil painter, his oeuvre includes still lifes of fruit and flowers, missions, figure and interior studies, and his forte, landscapes of northern California.

Straus died in San Francisco on March 11, 1905.

Exh:  San Francisco Art Association, 1875-1910; Mechanics’ Inst. (SF), 1875-97; Calif. State Fair, 1879-96 (medals); New Orleans Expo, 1885; Bohemian Club.

In: Nevada Museum (Reno); Oakland Museum; CHS; Society of Calif. Pioneers.

Edan Hughes, author of the book “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
The Golden Era Magazine, April 1885; Bay of San Francisco.

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Louisiana Bayou
  • SIZE: 20″ X 26″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Sleeping Ducks

Louisiana Bayou

Meyer Straus was born in Bavaria in 1831.  He emigrated from Germany to the U.S. in 1848.  For a short while he lived in Ohio and in 1853 moved to St Louis, MO where he worked as a scene painter in the Old Pine Street Theater.

After a few years in Mobile, New Orleans, and other parts of the South, in 1872 he moved to Chicago where he painted scenery at Hooley’s Theater.  Due to failing health and the severe winters, he was forced to seek a milder climate.  In 1875 Straus made his final move to San Francisco where he continued painting theatrical scenery for Tom Maguire, proprietor of the Bush Street Theater, and for the Grand Opera House.

In 1876 he made a painting trip to Aspen, CO.  Returning to San Francisco, in 1877 he abandoned theater work to devote full time to easel painting.  After establishing a studio at 728 Montgomery, he began making sketching trips to Yosemite, Marin County, the Monterey Peninsula, and Oregon.  He illustrated these scenes in Century and other national magazines.  In 1890 he became a U.S. citizen and by that time was supporting himself with his paintings.

An accomplished and prolific oil painter, his oeuvre includes still lifes of fruit and flowers, missions, figure and interior studies, and his forte, landscapes of northern California.

Straus died in San Francisco on March 11, 1905.

Exh:  San Francisco Art Association, 1875-1910; Mechanics’ Inst. (SF), 1875-97; Calif. State Fair, 1879-96 (medals); New Orleans Expo, 1885; Bohemian Club.

In: Nevada Museum (Reno); Oakland Museum; CHS; Society of Calif. Pioneers.

Edan Hughes, author of the book “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
The Golden Era Magazine, April 1885; Bay of San Francisco.

 

Source: www.askart.com