• TITLE: Seaside View
  • SIZE: 24″ X 30″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Horses in Autumn Trees

Monterey Bay

Tabal Hotel

S.C. Yuan, is considered one of the finest painters to come out of the Monterey Peninsula.  A “painter’s painter”, he did work which was favored by contemporary painters who marvel at his effortless technique. “Yuan’s strength as an artist was his ability to communicate a wealth of visual information with swift and concise markings,” says Kathleen Moodie, Curator at the Museum of Art and History in Santa Cruz. “Yuan fused an Eastern elegance of economic line with the robust energy of Western abstraction,” she added in the catalogue for an upcoming show of Yuan’s works.

Yuan said that “Color is like pouring Tabasco sauce over one’s dinner.  Color ruins painting.” A friend explained how Yuan tamed colors:  “After he finished a painting, he would scoop the remainder of the wet paint off the palette into a quart jar. This was the gold, precious stuff. He would start his new paintings from this jar of old paint. “Turp” was added to the mixture from time to time.” Some tabasco!

Yuan was a Western-style painter who happened to grow up in China and made an important contribution to the art of Carmel.  As he becomes better known, much will be made, unnecessarily, about his Eastern origin.  He squinted, didn’t clean his brushes too well, and used paint sludge to produce a subdued palette that reflected the moodiness of his heart.

His training was classical French via Xu Beihong, one of China’s greatest 20th Century painters.  A thoughtful friend and fellow painter, Keith Lindberg, said that the Chinese line and Armin Hansen were the two greatest influences in Yuan’s work. Yuan also admired William Ritschel.

Cutting his life short to match his father’s time on earth, Yuan worked feverishly during the 25 years he lived on the Monterey peninsula.  He was born in 1911 in the southern Chinese province of Chikiang to a Kuomintang colonel.  Although a first-born son, he was shunted aside by his mother who favored the second born, a daughter.  She sent him to live 40 miles away with his grandparents. Yuan did not have to imagine rejection; it was real.

He grew up, then, not only without his family, but also in a country where East and West were clashing, leaving no middle ground for observers. He must have been affected by the struggle between the moderate, bourgeois Chiang Kai-Shek and the radical dictator of the proletariat, as they staggered across China struggling to replace feudalism.  But, in America, he never spoke publicly about either misfortune.

But, artists don’t need social upheaval to struggle.  Painting and eating are demanding appetites. Yuan’s first job in the Peninsula,1952, was at the Highlands Inn.  His first show was at the Monterey Defense Language Institute, 1953, where he worked as an instructor.  By 1955, his wife Jen-Chi became, and remained, the principal financial support of their family.  That same year, he opened a gallery on Alvarado Street in Monterey and joined the Carmel Art Association.  Throughout his marriage, he astonished Jen-Chi, buying Porsches, secretly borrowing from the banks, taking extravagant trips, and making friends with women visiting Carmel who were often surprised to discover a Mrs. Yuan.

He signed his early paintings “Wellington Yuan,” honoring the last Kuomintang Ambassador to the U.S.  Throughout his career, he occasionally signed his works with the chop symbol for “no name.” And on one occasion he even used the name “Zambini” to disguise his entry of an abstract work in an art competition, fearing that judges would not fairly evaluate the painting since it was such a departure from his regular work.  He won the competition – Best of Show, Monterey County Fair.

Throughout the 1950’s, he entered many shows, won many awards, and showed both Eastern and Western styles.  In 1957, he moved to Carmel.  In 1958, his second-born child died, and he stopped painting for months.  He opened a restaurant on Cannery Row, which failed because his non-egg roll menu was too sophisticated for the times.  By the end of the year, he had his first one-man show, at the Carmel Art Association.  One review noted that his painting was loosening up, letting go of the cameras view of nature.

During the 1960’s, he began traveling, often lavishly, to Europe.  Most of his time he took pictures instead of painting, and told his friends that it gave him material for the scenes people liked to buy.  He was generous with his disdain to both collectors and gallery owners.  Once, when he overheard prospective clients deciding that only one part of his painting worked, he tore out the studied section and offered it for sale, as is.  On other occasions he was known to barge into galleries and sabotage sales in progress.

He financed his first trip to Europe from a $6,000 commission he received for painting a fruit and vegetable mural in the Monte Mart Market in Salinas.  In Europe, he ordered a Mercedes, bought fine Italian suits for himself and dresses for Jen-Chi (which were inexplicably grossly oversized), and quickly ran out of money.  On another trip he sailed with his Cadillac, which he had to send back after finding that he could not pass through the narrow streets of Europe.

He won “Best of Show” at the Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art in 1967, which led to a one-man show there in 1968.  In 1969, he was back in the restaurant business, opening up the Merry Peach in Carmel Valley, which he filled to the ceiling with his paintings.

Paintings he didn’t like, he stored under his house; the favorites were piled everywhere else.  He saved his “chickens” (the best of his paintings) for his daughter Rae, so she would never have to work; and he tried to sell only the “eggs” (copies of the chickens).  When Sheila Shepard, his last student, helped him move, he became frustrated and angry because she tried to evade his questions about which paintings to save.  He started a bonfire in his backyard and began burning some of his paintings, including one that he told her was a “$10,000.00 Hansen.”

His last one-man show was at the Pacific Grove Art Center in 1972.  Thereafter, Jen-Chi finally left him – perhaps exasperated with his moodiness, flippancy, and self-indulgence.  His grief over the lost marriage dove-tailed neatly, however, with his occasionally shared prediction that he would not outlive his fathers age; and in his last two years he painted furiously, producing some of his finest work.

On September 4, 1974, he hung his last show at the Carmel Art Association.  Two days later he killed himself.  After three days of shock and mourning, his fellow members bought out almost the entire show.

Yuan said that “Art should have something to say to the viewer, and only then is it honest art, which has permanent value.”  His moodiness is the most honest trait in his paintings and in his life.  And the skill with which he expressed that moodiness places him with the best of the Monterey school. He fits easily between Hansen’s bold and colorful exaltation of the majestic sea and Fortunes exquisite overview of the Peninsula. Yuan’s still lives will appear in a traveling museum show beginning in June.

Submitted by Sarah Bessera

Sources
S.C. Yuan
, 1994, by the Carmel Art Association
Sarah Bessera, The Plein Air Scene: Featured Historic Artist S.C. Yuan 1911-1974

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Tabal Hotel
  • SIZE: 24″ X 30″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Horses in Autumn Trees

Monterey Bay

Seaside View

S.C. Yuan, is considered one of the finest painters to come out of the Monterey Peninsula.  A “painter’s painter”, he did work which was favored by contemporary painters who marvel at his effortless technique. “Yuan’s strength as an artist was his ability to communicate a wealth of visual information with swift and concise markings,” says Kathleen Moodie, Curator at the Museum of Art and History in Santa Cruz. “Yuan fused an Eastern elegance of economic line with the robust energy of Western abstraction,” she added in the catalogue for an upcoming show of Yuan’s works.

Yuan said that “Color is like pouring Tabasco sauce over one’s dinner.  Color ruins painting.” A friend explained how Yuan tamed colors:  “After he finished a painting, he would scoop the remainder of the wet paint off the palette into a quart jar. This was the gold, precious stuff. He would start his new paintings from this jar of old paint. “Turp” was added to the mixture from time to time.” Some tabasco!

Yuan was a Western-style painter who happened to grow up in China and made an important contribution to the art of Carmel.  As he becomes better known, much will be made, unnecessarily, about his Eastern origin.  He squinted, didn’t clean his brushes too well, and used paint sludge to produce a subdued palette that reflected the moodiness of his heart.

His training was classical French via Xu Beihong, one of China’s greatest 20th Century painters.  A thoughtful friend and fellow painter, Keith Lindberg, said that the Chinese line and Armin Hansen were the two greatest influences in Yuan’s work. Yuan also admired William Ritschel.

Cutting his life short to match his father’s time on earth, Yuan worked feverishly during the 25 years he lived on the Monterey peninsula.  He was born in 1911 in the southern Chinese province of Chikiang to a Kuomintang colonel.  Although a first-born son, he was shunted aside by his mother who favored the second born, a daughter.  She sent him to live 40 miles away with his grandparents. Yuan did not have to imagine rejection; it was real.

He grew up, then, not only without his family, but also in a country where East and West were clashing, leaving no middle ground for observers. He must have been affected by the struggle between the moderate, bourgeois Chiang Kai-Shek and the radical dictator of the proletariat, as they staggered across China struggling to replace feudalism.  But, in America, he never spoke publicly about either misfortune.

But, artists don’t need social upheaval to struggle.  Painting and eating are demanding appetites. Yuan’s first job in the Peninsula,1952, was at the Highlands Inn.  His first show was at the Monterey Defense Language Institute, 1953, where he worked as an instructor.  By 1955, his wife Jen-Chi became, and remained, the principal financial support of their family.  That same year, he opened a gallery on Alvarado Street in Monterey and joined the Carmel Art Association.  Throughout his marriage, he astonished Jen-Chi, buying Porsches, secretly borrowing from the banks, taking extravagant trips, and making friends with women visiting Carmel who were often surprised to discover a Mrs. Yuan.

He signed his early paintings “Wellington Yuan,” honoring the last Kuomintang Ambassador to the U.S.  Throughout his career, he occasionally signed his works with the chop symbol for “no name.” And on one occasion he even used the name “Zambini” to disguise his entry of an abstract work in an art competition, fearing that judges would not fairly evaluate the painting since it was such a departure from his regular work.  He won the competition – Best of Show, Monterey County Fair.

Throughout the 1950’s, he entered many shows, won many awards, and showed both Eastern and Western styles.  In 1957, he moved to Carmel.  In 1958, his second-born child died, and he stopped painting for months.  He opened a restaurant on Cannery Row, which failed because his non-egg roll menu was too sophisticated for the times.  By the end of the year, he had his first one-man show, at the Carmel Art Association.  One review noted that his painting was loosening up, letting go of the cameras view of nature.

During the 1960’s, he began traveling, often lavishly, to Europe.  Most of his time he took pictures instead of painting, and told his friends that it gave him material for the scenes people liked to buy.  He was generous with his disdain to both collectors and gallery owners.  Once, when he overheard prospective clients deciding that only one part of his painting worked, he tore out the studied section and offered it for sale, as is.  On other occasions he was known to barge into galleries and sabotage sales in progress.

He financed his first trip to Europe from a $6,000 commission he received for painting a fruit and vegetable mural in the Monte Mart Market in Salinas.  In Europe, he ordered a Mercedes, bought fine Italian suits for himself and dresses for Jen-Chi (which were inexplicably grossly oversized), and quickly ran out of money.  On another trip he sailed with his Cadillac, which he had to send back after finding that he could not pass through the narrow streets of Europe.

He won “Best of Show” at the Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art in 1967, which led to a one-man show there in 1968.  In 1969, he was back in the restaurant business, opening up the Merry Peach in Carmel Valley, which he filled to the ceiling with his paintings.

Paintings he didn’t like, he stored under his house; the favorites were piled everywhere else.  He saved his “chickens” (the best of his paintings) for his daughter Rae, so she would never have to work; and he tried to sell only the “eggs” (copies of the chickens).  When Sheila Shepard, his last student, helped him move, he became frustrated and angry because she tried to evade his questions about which paintings to save.  He started a bonfire in his backyard and began burning some of his paintings, including one that he told her was a “$10,000.00 Hansen.”

His last one-man show was at the Pacific Grove Art Center in 1972.  Thereafter, Jen-Chi finally left him – perhaps exasperated with his moodiness, flippancy, and self-indulgence.  His grief over the lost marriage dove-tailed neatly, however, with his occasionally shared prediction that he would not outlive his fathers age; and in his last two years he painted furiously, producing some of his finest work.

On September 4, 1974, he hung his last show at the Carmel Art Association.  Two days later he killed himself.  After three days of shock and mourning, his fellow members bought out almost the entire show.

Yuan said that “Art should have something to say to the viewer, and only then is it honest art, which has permanent value.”  His moodiness is the most honest trait in his paintings and in his life.  And the skill with which he expressed that moodiness places him with the best of the Monterey school. He fits easily between Hansen’s bold and colorful exaltation of the majestic sea and Fortunes exquisite overview of the Peninsula. Yuan’s still lives will appear in a traveling museum show beginning in June.

Submitted by Sarah Bessera

Sources
S.C. Yuan
, 1994, by the Carmel Art Association
Sarah Bessera, The Plein Air Scene: Featured Historic Artist S.C. Yuan 1911-1974

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Monterey Bay
  • SIZE: 30″ X 40″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Horses in Autumn Trees

Tabal Hotel

Seaside View

S.C. Yuan, is considered one of the finest painters to come out of the Monterey Peninsula.  A “painter’s painter”, he did work which was favored by contemporary painters who marvel at his effortless technique. “Yuan’s strength as an artist was his ability to communicate a wealth of visual information with swift and concise markings,” says Kathleen Moodie, Curator at the Museum of Art and History in Santa Cruz. “Yuan fused an Eastern elegance of economic line with the robust energy of Western abstraction,” she added in the catalogue for an upcoming show of Yuan’s works.

Yuan said that “Color is like pouring Tabasco sauce over one’s dinner.  Color ruins painting.” A friend explained how Yuan tamed colors:  “After he finished a painting, he would scoop the remainder of the wet paint off the palette into a quart jar. This was the gold, precious stuff. He would start his new paintings from this jar of old paint. “Turp” was added to the mixture from time to time.” Some tabasco!

Yuan was a Western-style painter who happened to grow up in China and made an important contribution to the art of Carmel.  As he becomes better known, much will be made, unnecessarily, about his Eastern origin.  He squinted, didn’t clean his brushes too well, and used paint sludge to produce a subdued palette that reflected the moodiness of his heart.

His training was classical French via Xu Beihong, one of China’s greatest 20th Century painters.  A thoughtful friend and fellow painter, Keith Lindberg, said that the Chinese line and Armin Hansen were the two greatest influences in Yuan’s work. Yuan also admired William Ritschel.

Cutting his life short to match his father’s time on earth, Yuan worked feverishly during the 25 years he lived on the Monterey peninsula.  He was born in 1911 in the southern Chinese province of Chikiang to a Kuomintang colonel.  Although a first-born son, he was shunted aside by his mother who favored the second born, a daughter.  She sent him to live 40 miles away with his grandparents. Yuan did not have to imagine rejection; it was real.

He grew up, then, not only without his family, but also in a country where East and West were clashing, leaving no middle ground for observers. He must have been affected by the struggle between the moderate, bourgeois Chiang Kai-Shek and the radical dictator of the proletariat, as they staggered across China struggling to replace feudalism.  But, in America, he never spoke publicly about either misfortune.

But, artists don’t need social upheaval to struggle.  Painting and eating are demanding appetites. Yuan’s first job in the Peninsula,1952, was at the Highlands Inn.  His first show was at the Monterey Defense Language Institute, 1953, where he worked as an instructor.  By 1955, his wife Jen-Chi became, and remained, the principal financial support of their family.  That same year, he opened a gallery on Alvarado Street in Monterey and joined the Carmel Art Association.  Throughout his marriage, he astonished Jen-Chi, buying Porsches, secretly borrowing from the banks, taking extravagant trips, and making friends with women visiting Carmel who were often surprised to discover a Mrs. Yuan.

He signed his early paintings “Wellington Yuan,” honoring the last Kuomintang Ambassador to the U.S.  Throughout his career, he occasionally signed his works with the chop symbol for “no name.” And on one occasion he even used the name “Zambini” to disguise his entry of an abstract work in an art competition, fearing that judges would not fairly evaluate the painting since it was such a departure from his regular work.  He won the competition – Best of Show, Monterey County Fair.

Throughout the 1950’s, he entered many shows, won many awards, and showed both Eastern and Western styles.  In 1957, he moved to Carmel.  In 1958, his second-born child died, and he stopped painting for months.  He opened a restaurant on Cannery Row, which failed because his non-egg roll menu was too sophisticated for the times.  By the end of the year, he had his first one-man show, at the Carmel Art Association.  One review noted that his painting was loosening up, letting go of the cameras view of nature.

During the 1960’s, he began traveling, often lavishly, to Europe.  Most of his time he took pictures instead of painting, and told his friends that it gave him material for the scenes people liked to buy.  He was generous with his disdain to both collectors and gallery owners.  Once, when he overheard prospective clients deciding that only one part of his painting worked, he tore out the studied section and offered it for sale, as is.  On other occasions he was known to barge into galleries and sabotage sales in progress.

He financed his first trip to Europe from a $6,000 commission he received for painting a fruit and vegetable mural in the Monte Mart Market in Salinas.  In Europe, he ordered a Mercedes, bought fine Italian suits for himself and dresses for Jen-Chi (which were inexplicably grossly oversized), and quickly ran out of money.  On another trip he sailed with his Cadillac, which he had to send back after finding that he could not pass through the narrow streets of Europe.

He won “Best of Show” at the Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art in 1967, which led to a one-man show there in 1968.  In 1969, he was back in the restaurant business, opening up the Merry Peach in Carmel Valley, which he filled to the ceiling with his paintings.

Paintings he didn’t like, he stored under his house; the favorites were piled everywhere else.  He saved his “chickens” (the best of his paintings) for his daughter Rae, so she would never have to work; and he tried to sell only the “eggs” (copies of the chickens).  When Sheila Shepard, his last student, helped him move, he became frustrated and angry because she tried to evade his questions about which paintings to save.  He started a bonfire in his backyard and began burning some of his paintings, including one that he told her was a “$10,000.00 Hansen.”

His last one-man show was at the Pacific Grove Art Center in 1972.  Thereafter, Jen-Chi finally left him – perhaps exasperated with his moodiness, flippancy, and self-indulgence.  His grief over the lost marriage dove-tailed neatly, however, with his occasionally shared prediction that he would not outlive his fathers age; and in his last two years he painted furiously, producing some of his finest work.

On September 4, 1974, he hung his last show at the Carmel Art Association.  Two days later he killed himself.  After three days of shock and mourning, his fellow members bought out almost the entire show.

Yuan said that “Art should have something to say to the viewer, and only then is it honest art, which has permanent value.”  His moodiness is the most honest trait in his paintings and in his life.  And the skill with which he expressed that moodiness places him with the best of the Monterey school. He fits easily between Hansen’s bold and colorful exaltation of the majestic sea and Fortunes exquisite overview of the Peninsula. Yuan’s still lives will appear in a traveling museum show beginning in June.

Submitted by Sarah Bessera

Sources
S.C. Yuan
, 1994, by the Carmel Art Association
Sarah Bessera, The Plein Air Scene: Featured Historic Artist S.C. Yuan 1911-1974

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Coastal Trees
  • SIZE: 12″ X 16″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Board
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Big Sur

Farm with Eucalyptus

Coastal Cottage

Palm Springs

M. DeNeale Morgan, as she signed her work, was one of Carmel’s distinguished plein air painters–a generous spirit who worked tirelessly for various Carmel civic groups.  Her mother’s family emigrated from Scotland to the Monterey area in 1856, homesteading a ranch near Point Piňos and then in the Salinas Valley.  It was partly because of her family’s stories about the beauty of the Monterey Peninsula that DeNeale Morgan came here to live and work.

Born in San Francisco in 1868, she was taken to Oakland in 1872, where the painter and teacher William Keith was her first teacher.  She was precocious. In 1886 she enrolled in the California School of Design in San Francisco and studied with Emil Carlsen and Amédée Joullin until 1890. She paid her first visit to Carmel in 1903.  In 1910 she returned to buy the studio and home of the late Sydney Yard, located next to what is now the Cypress Inn on Lincoln. From then on through the 1940’s, her studio was filled with tourists, buyers, other artists and friends. The building, ever expanding with new rooms and more paintings, became a meeting place for civic activists.

Her style was her own, sometimes containing elements of the Barbizon School, sometimes tonalist or California impressionist, but always distinctly her own, usually in vivid color with broad, bold strokes, sometimes laid on with a palette knife.  When pressed to say what school of painting she belonged to, she replied that she was a “horse and buggy artist.”  She refused to be typed.  Her favorite subject was the Monterey cypresses. When asked if she didn’t tire of that subject, she replied that she “would stick by her cypress trees till they sink into the sea, or–what is just as tragic and final–be hopelessly built-around.”

In 1915, she won a Silver Medal at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco; in 1928 she was selected by Scribner’s Magazine as one of the nation’s foremost women artists.  She rarely travelled outside Carmel, never outside the U.S., but had one-woman shows in San Francisco, New York, Washington, D.C. and Chicago.

A community activist, she was a member of the Save the Dunes Committee, which met in her studio to oppose a developer’s plan for a big tourist hotel at the foot of Ocean Avenue.  Morgan, Fred Bechdolt and Talbert Josselyn were selected from the group of forty to approach Frank Devendorf about buying the property. “Devy” agreed to sell the 15 acres to the city for the grossly undervalued price of $15,000.  The voters agreed to spend the money and the developer was stymied.

DeNeale Morgan was also an original member of the Forest Theater, for which she designed sets.  Wearing her distinctive purple cloak, she was active with the Carmel Arts and Crafts Club, the forerunner of the Carmel Art Association. During World War I, she was the director of the Carmel Summer School of Art, an offshoot of the Art and Crafts Club.  It was she who invited William Merritt Chase, distinguished New York artist and teacher, to teach at the Summer School, greatly increasing Carmel’s reputation as an art center, both here and on the East Coast. She was a founding member of the Carmel Art Association and of All Saints’ Church, where she attended communion services every morning at 8 o’clock. During World War II, service men who were stranded in Carmel on Saturday nights could always find a bed in her studio and breakfast the next morning. Every Thursday afternoon she cut out portrait silhouettes–upwards of four hundred–for patients at the Fort Ord Hospital.

She always painted on location so that she could capture the light, color and mood of her subject. DeNeale Morgan died on Oct. 10, 1948, at the age of 80. Four days before, she was at Point Lobos painting a cypress. After her death, the unfinished canvas was hung in her studio. Brother Cornelius, William Keith’s biographer, wrote in Morgan’s copy of his book: “To Miss DeNeale Morgan, master painter of the strange form, color and texture, the weather beaten toughness, the ancient fantastic weirdness, in a word, of the truth of our beloved Monterey cypresses …”

Source:
website: carmelresidents.org

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Coastal Cottage
  • SIZE: 20″ X 16″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Big Sur

Farm with Eucalyptus

Coastal Trees

Palm Springs

M. DeNeale Morgan, as she signed her work, was one of Carmel’s distinguished plein air painters–a generous spirit who worked tirelessly for various Carmel civic groups.  Her mother’s family emigrated from Scotland to the Monterey area in 1856, homesteading a ranch near Point Piňos and then in the Salinas Valley.  It was partly because of her family’s stories about the beauty of the Monterey Peninsula that DeNeale Morgan came here to live and work.

Born in San Francisco in 1868, she was taken to Oakland in 1872, where the painter and teacher William Keith was her first teacher.  She was precocious. In 1886 she enrolled in the California School of Design in San Francisco and studied with Emil Carlsen and Amédée Joullin until 1890. She paid her first visit to Carmel in 1903.  In 1910 she returned to buy the studio and home of the late Sydney Yard, located next to what is now the Cypress Inn on Lincoln. From then on through the 1940’s, her studio was filled with tourists, buyers, other artists and friends. The building, ever expanding with new rooms and more paintings, became a meeting place for civic activists.

Her style was her own, sometimes containing elements of the Barbizon School, sometimes tonalist or California impressionist, but always distinctly her own, usually in vivid color with broad, bold strokes, sometimes laid on with a palette knife.  When pressed to say what school of painting she belonged to, she replied that she was a “horse and buggy artist.”  She refused to be typed.  Her favorite subject was the Monterey cypresses. When asked if she didn’t tire of that subject, she replied that she “would stick by her cypress trees till they sink into the sea, or–what is just as tragic and final–be hopelessly built-around.”

In 1915, she won a Silver Medal at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco; in 1928 she was selected by Scribner’s Magazine as one of the nation’s foremost women artists.  She rarely travelled outside Carmel, never outside the U.S., but had one-woman shows in San Francisco, New York, Washington, D.C. and Chicago.

A community activist, she was a member of the Save the Dunes Committee, which met in her studio to oppose a developer’s plan for a big tourist hotel at the foot of Ocean Avenue.  Morgan, Fred Bechdolt and Talbert Josselyn were selected from the group of forty to approach Frank Devendorf about buying the property. “Devy” agreed to sell the 15 acres to the city for the grossly undervalued price of $15,000.  The voters agreed to spend the money and the developer was stymied.

DeNeale Morgan was also an original member of the Forest Theater, for which she designed sets.  Wearing her distinctive purple cloak, she was active with the Carmel Arts and Crafts Club, the forerunner of the Carmel Art Association. During World War I, she was the director of the Carmel Summer School of Art, an offshoot of the Art and Crafts Club.  It was she who invited William Merritt Chase, distinguished New York artist and teacher, to teach at the Summer School, greatly increasing Carmel’s reputation as an art center, both here and on the East Coast. She was a founding member of the Carmel Art Association and of All Saints’ Church, where she attended communion services every morning at 8 o’clock. During World War II, service men who were stranded in Carmel on Saturday nights could always find a bed in her studio and breakfast the next morning. Every Thursday afternoon she cut out portrait silhouettes–upwards of four hundred–for patients at the Fort Ord Hospital.

She always painted on location so that she could capture the light, color and mood of her subject. DeNeale Morgan died on Oct. 10, 1948, at the age of 80. Four days before, she was at Point Lobos painting a cypress. After her death, the unfinished canvas was hung in her studio. Brother Cornelius, William Keith’s biographer, wrote in Morgan’s copy of his book: “To Miss DeNeale Morgan, master painter of the strange form, color and texture, the weather beaten toughness, the ancient fantastic weirdness, in a word, of the truth of our beloved Monterey cypresses …”

Source:
website: carmelresidents.org

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Farm with Eucalyptus
  • SIZE: 25″ X 30″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Big Sur

Coastal Cottage

Coastal Trees

Palm Springs

M. DeNeale Morgan, as she signed her work, was one of Carmel’s distinguished plein air painters–a generous spirit who worked tirelessly for various Carmel civic groups.  Her mother’s family emigrated from Scotland to the Monterey area in 1856, homesteading a ranch near Point Piňos and then in the Salinas Valley.  It was partly because of her family’s stories about the beauty of the Monterey Peninsula that DeNeale Morgan came here to live and work.

Born in San Francisco in 1868, she was taken to Oakland in 1872, where the painter and teacher William Keith was her first teacher.  She was precocious. In 1886 she enrolled in the California School of Design in San Francisco and studied with Emil Carlsen and Amédée Joullin until 1890. She paid her first visit to Carmel in 1903.  In 1910 she returned to buy the studio and home of the late Sydney Yard, located next to what is now the Cypress Inn on Lincoln. From then on through the 1940’s, her studio was filled with tourists, buyers, other artists and friends. The building, ever expanding with new rooms and more paintings, became a meeting place for civic activists.

Her style was her own, sometimes containing elements of the Barbizon School, sometimes tonalist or California impressionist, but always distinctly her own, usually in vivid color with broad, bold strokes, sometimes laid on with a palette knife.  When pressed to say what school of painting she belonged to, she replied that she was a “horse and buggy artist.”  She refused to be typed.  Her favorite subject was the Monterey cypresses. When asked if she didn’t tire of that subject, she replied that she “would stick by her cypress trees till they sink into the sea, or–what is just as tragic and final–be hopelessly built-around.”

In 1915, she won a Silver Medal at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco; in 1928 she was selected by Scribner’s Magazine as one of the nation’s foremost women artists.  She rarely travelled outside Carmel, never outside the U.S., but had one-woman shows in San Francisco, New York, Washington, D.C. and Chicago.

A community activist, she was a member of the Save the Dunes Committee, which met in her studio to oppose a developer’s plan for a big tourist hotel at the foot of Ocean Avenue.  Morgan, Fred Bechdolt and Talbert Josselyn were selected from the group of forty to approach Frank Devendorf about buying the property. “Devy” agreed to sell the 15 acres to the city for the grossly undervalued price of $15,000.  The voters agreed to spend the money and the developer was stymied.

DeNeale Morgan was also an original member of the Forest Theater, for which she designed sets.  Wearing her distinctive purple cloak, she was active with the Carmel Arts and Crafts Club, the forerunner of the Carmel Art Association. During World War I, she was the director of the Carmel Summer School of Art, an offshoot of the Art and Crafts Club.  It was she who invited William Merritt Chase, distinguished New York artist and teacher, to teach at the Summer School, greatly increasing Carmel’s reputation as an art center, both here and on the East Coast. She was a founding member of the Carmel Art Association and of All Saints’ Church, where she attended communion services every morning at 8 o’clock. During World War II, service men who were stranded in Carmel on Saturday nights could always find a bed in her studio and breakfast the next morning. Every Thursday afternoon she cut out portrait silhouettes–upwards of four hundred–for patients at the Fort Ord Hospital.

She always painted on location so that she could capture the light, color and mood of her subject. DeNeale Morgan died on Oct. 10, 1948, at the age of 80. Four days before, she was at Point Lobos painting a cypress. After her death, the unfinished canvas was hung in her studio. Brother Cornelius, William Keith’s biographer, wrote in Morgan’s copy of his book: “To Miss DeNeale Morgan, master painter of the strange form, color and texture, the weather beaten toughness, the ancient fantastic weirdness, in a word, of the truth of our beloved Monterey cypresses …”

Source:
website: carmelresidents.org

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Anne Lorraine Vollmer
  • SIZE: 25″ X 21″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Top Right
  • DATED: c.1925
  • NOTES: Featured in the book From a Versatile Brush, the LIFE of ART of JEAN MANNHEIM

Woman Reading

Jean-Manhaiem-third-2

Woman in Kitchen

Born in Bad Kreuznach on the Nahe, Germany on Nov. 18, 1863.  After being drafted into the German army, Mannheim deserted and fled to France where he studied art at Ecole Delecluse, Académie Colarossi, and with DeLancey and Bouguereau.  Having learned book binding early in life, he used this trade to support himself while studying art in Paris.

Upon immigrating to Illinois in 1884, he painted portraits in Chicago and taught in a Decatur art school.  About 1903 he accepted a position at Frank Brangwyn’s school in London and stayed for two years.  Returning to the U.S., he taught at the Denver Art School until 1908. He then made his final move to Pasadena and built a home in the Arroyo Seco.  Mannheim maintained a studio in the Blanchard Building in Los Angeles where he exhibited and taught, and in 1913 founded the Stickney Memorial School of Fine Arts in Pasadena.  His figure studies and landscapes prior to 1915 were tighter and done with a restricted palette; whereas, his palette then lightened and he adopted the loose brushwork of Impressionism. He died in Pasadena on Sept. 6, 1945.

Member: Laguna Beach AA; Long Beach AA.

Exh: Paris Salon, 1897; Blanchard Gallery (LA), 1909; Alaska-Yukon Expo (Seattle), 1909 (gold medal); Calif. Art Club, 1911-31; Kanst Gallery (LA), 1912, 1918; Pasadena Art Inst., 1913, 1926, 1928; Throop College (Pasadena), 1914; Woman’s Clubhouse (Hollywood), 1914; Friday Morning Club (LA), 1914, 1940; Panama-Calif. Expo (San Diego), 1915 (gold & silver medals); LACMA, 1915, 1917, 1922; Pasadena Society of Artists, 1917-37; Painters & Sculptors of LA, 1922-24; Arizona State Fair, 1923 (1st prize); Southby Salon (LA), 1925; Painters of the West (LA), 1925-27; Biltmore Salon (LA), 1926; Ebell Club (LA), 1926, 1935, 1936, 1938; Sierra Madre City Hall, 1930; Gardena High School, 1934; Foundation of Western Art (LA), 1935-42; Academy of Western Painters (LA), 1935; Webb Gallery (LA), 1938; GGIE, 1939.

In: Orange County (CA) Museum; Long Beach Museum; Denver Museum; Irvine (CA) Museum.

Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”
Southern California Artists (Nancy Moure); Who’s Who in America 1918; American Art Annual 1919-29;Plein Air Painters (Ruth Westphal); Art in California (R. L. Bernier, 1916); Overland Monthly, Sept. 1933;Who’s Who in American Art 1936-41; So. Calif. Artists 1890-1940; Los Angeles Times, 4-5-1936 & 9-8-1945 (obituary).

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Palos Verdes
  • SIZE: 20″ X 24″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas
  • SIGNED: Lower Right

Palos Verdes by the Sea

Born in Larvik, Norway, Paul Lauritz became a noted painter based in California of portraits and desert landscapes. Early in his career, he was in Alaska.

He was raised in the picturesque Norwegian village of Larvik and exposed to famous painters from all over the world who came there for subject matter. One of them, an English watercolorist, gave him painting lessons in exchange for his family providing board and room, and local painters Fritz Thoulaw and Christian Krogh also encouraged him as a young man.

At age 16, he headed West and got a job in Vancouver, Canada, and then Portland, Oregon as a commercial artist doing maps, posters and decorations. In Portland, he married Mary Potterton in 1912, and then began a career as a serious portrait artist.

However, the lure of gold in Alaska took him and Mary to Sunrise Creek, where they lost money, and he vowed he would never again be distracted from his art work. He became close to Alaska’s most distinguished artist, Sydney Lawrence, who was impressed by Lauritz’ determination and encouraged his art career in every way.

Just after World War I, he and his wife moved to Los Angeles when the city was beginning to boom, and he had a studio from which he did portrait painting on Spring Street in the old Lyceum Theater. In 1920, they moved to the hills overlooking the city and built the first dwelling on Clayton Avenue. He developed a fascination for desert landscapes, and he and his wife did much exploring and extended camping in the deserts of the Mohave, Colorado, and Arizona.

At first, he did plein air painting but discovered that he got a stronger light on the canvas by completing the work in his studio. He used gigantic brushes, pre-war French bristles, and even used them to achieve minute strokes. He also used palette knives and his hand to achieve a textural effect and generally simple, basic colors.

He was active in the California art scene as a member of the Los Angeles Municipal Art Commission and President of the California Art Club, plein air landscape painters for whom he gave numerous painting demonstrations and workshops. His work was sold by the Artists Guild of America and the Vose Galleries of Boston. During World War II, the King of Norway purchased one of his marine paintings that was transported by submarine.

Source: Edan Hughes, “Artists in California, 1786-1940”

 

Source: www.askart.com

  • TITLE: Poppies and Lupine
  • SIZE: 13.5″ X 9.75″
  • MEDIUM: Oil on Board
  • SIGNED: Lower Left

Lady in Hammock

The following is from Frank Lonteen:

William Franklin Jackson was born at Council Bluffs, Iowa, February 20, 1850. In 1862 his family crossed the plains by ox team, arriving in Sacramento during the Spring of 1863 where he lived during his early boyhood. Later he attended the School of Design in San Francisco where he studied under the direction of Virgil Williams and was also a pupil of Benoni Irwin, who was famous for his portrait and figure painting.

After his marriage to Ida Nichols he opened his first studio in San Francisco where he became closely associated with the late William Keith. He remained there for several years conducting his studio and then returned
to Sacramento in 1880 where he resided for the remainder of his life.

In May 1885, he was chosen as the instructor of the California School of
Design in the E.B. Crocker Art Gallery which was sponsored by the
California Museum Association. A few years later he was appointed Curator of the Art Gallery which position he held for over fifty years. In connection with his position, he maintained his private studio, first confining his efforts to portrait and figure painting and later becoming interested in landscape painting particularly depicting California poppy fields.

Mr. Jackson continued painting until the time of his death, January 8,
1936.
———————————————————————
The following is from AskART:

William Franklin Jackson was an accomplished California artist known for his painted views of poppy fields. Jackson was born in 1850 in Council Bluffs, Iowa, and at the age of twelve he and his family headed west to California. Jackson lived in San Francisco, California, and attended the California School of Design studying under Virgil Williams. Later in his career he took many painting trips to the American River and the Sierra Nevada Mountains with painter friend William Keith.

Jacksons style, and that of his contemporaries John Gamble and Granville Redmond, was a departure from the already popular landscapes of the East Coast. The brightly colored floral countryside of California was a sharp contrast to the wooded Adirondack and Catskill Mountains of New York.

By 1880 Jackson was living in Sacramento, California. In 1884 the prominent William H. Crocker Family deeded their art collection to the city of Sacramento. Jackson soon became the curator and director of the new art school associated with the Crocker collection. In 1915 he became a member of the commission of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco and also exhibited at the California State Fair. Jackson was still working for the Crocker collection in Sacramento, California at the time of his death in 1936.

 

Source: www.askart.com

    • TITLE: San Francisco Forty Niner
    • SIZE: 32″ X 40″
    • MEDIUM: Oil on Canvas

Sierra Camp

 

Primarily known as a California painter, George Henry Burgess was from a large family of artists.  A long-time resident of San Francisco, he also made periodic visits to the Hawaiian Islands.  Born in London in 1831, he studied at the Somerset House School of Design in London, and worked in a lithography shop in the city.  The California Gold Rush attracted George’s two brothers, Charles and Edward, and in 1850 he and his older brother, William, joined them there.  However, he and William soon turned from mining to running a jewelry store in Sonoma.

Charles and Edward Burgess lived in Honolulu for various periods;  Charles working as a photographer and portrait painter, and Edward as an agent selling his siblings’ artwork and running a coffee shop.

George Burgess made three trips to Hawaii, the first and longest being in 1855, and he remained in the islands for over a year.  In 1856, he produced a set of Honolulu views that were then offered for sale in 1857.  These lithographic scenes show Honolulu and its harbor, Queen Street, Nuuanu Valley, Diamond Head, and domestic scenes in the area of Ewa.  His scenes, which were published at Britton and Rey, San Francisco, are animated with the presence of human activity.  He also painted portraits of King Kamehameha IV and his queen, Emma, which are regarded as among the artist’s best works.

During his second trip to Hawaii in 1866, he created watercolors, drawings, and portraits, before returning to San Francisco in 1867.  He visited the islands a third time in 1871, after the death of his brother Edward.

In 1871, he became a co-founder of the San Francisco Art Association.  In 1872, George Burgess traveled to London, where he married Emma, a daughter of the artist Alfred Clint.

Returning to San Francisco, he painted portraits, gave art lessons, worked for the lithography firm of Britton & Rey, and executed a number of large history pieces.  His largest historical scene was a lithographic recreation, completed in 1894, of his view of San Francisco as it appeared in the fall of 1848.

Sources:
Edan Hughes, Artists in California, 1786-1940
David W. Forbes, Encounters in Paradise
Don Severson, Finding Paradise

 

Source: www.askart.com